A Government Case for Attending the World Congress:

Why are large government entities choosing to engage with the World Congress on Pain? Read below why the U.S. National Institutes of Health went all in by bringing seven agencies and centers, hosting a large booth at the Exhibition Hall, and offering a one-day symposium on chronic pain.

U.S. National Institutes of Health Showcases Its Diverse Pain Management Expertise and Programs

IASP partners with numerous government entities, nonprofits, patient advocacy organizations, universities, publishers, and others to bring the latest pain science and ideas to the global pain community. Held every two years, the World Congress on Pain is a primary vehicle for ensuring that new treatments, research, and opportunities are shared across disciplines and geographic boundaries to help relieve pain.

Here, IASP talks to one of its government partners, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), about why it decided to engage so heavily in the 17th World Congress on Pain September 12-16, 2018, in Boston.

IASP: In 2018 NIH will have seven institutes represented at the World Congress on Pain through its exhibit booth and hosted symposium. Why was it important to be part of this unique global conference?

NIH: There will be seven institutes, centers, or offices representing NIH—all are members of the NIH Pain Consortium. The NIH Pain Consortium was established to enhance pain research and promote collaboration across the many NIH institutes and centers that have programs and activities addressing pain. The NIH Pain Consortium decided that being a part of the World Congress on Pain was a way to increase the visibility of NIH-funded pain research and to network with professionals within the pain community.

Anyone interested in information about the NIH Pain Consortium can visit its website.

In addition, anyone who wants to more clearly understand the overall scope of each institute can read below.

What message(s) would you like to relay to IASP members and World Congress attendees ahead of the meeting?

We urge IASP members and delegates to sign up for the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health’s one-day research symposium, ‘Chronic Pain: The Science of Complementary and Integrative Health Approaches,’ September 11, 2018, organized by the NCCIH Pain Working Group. The registration fee is only $20 for the symposium.

The symposium will feature scientists on the following cross-cutting topics:

  • The past, present, and future of natural product research and pain management
  • The mechanisms by which a variety of mind and body approaches may modulate pain
  • Translational potential for complementary and integrative approaches for individual-based chronic pain management

We also encourage conference attendees to visit us at the NIH Pain Consortium Booth 107 to learn more about priorities and funding opportunities that are available from the seven institutes, centers, and offices.

Since the World Congress is a conference addressing a global audience, is your reach beyond U.S. delegates, and if so, why and how are you working to reach to this group?

Many of the institutes, centers, and offices that are members of the NIH Pain Consortium have international programs and collaborations that can be linked to from their homepages. Here is a list of those members.

Look for NIH in booth 107 at the Exhibition Hall September 13-16 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center.

To learn more about future exhibition opportunities at IASP meetings or the 2020 World Congress on Pain, please contact Sarah Wheeler at sarah.wheeler@iasp-pain.org.


A Quick Overview of the Scope of the Seven NIH Agencies and Centers Participating in the 17th World Congress on Pain

National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pain Consortium
The NIH Pain Consortium was established to enhance pain research and promote collaboration among researchers across the many NIH institutes and centers that have programs and activities addressing pain. Its goals are to

  • Develop a comprehensive and forward-thinking NIH pain research agenda.
  • Identify key opportunities in pain research, particularly those that provide for multidisciplinary and trans-NIH participation.
  • Increase visibility for pain research within the NIH intramural and extramural communities and outside NIH.
  • Pursue the pain research agenda through public-private partnerships, wherever applicable.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institutes of Health
The mission of NINDS is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease. NINDS’ portfolio of pain grants consists of projects related to migraine, other headache disorders, neuropathic pain, peripheral and central mechanisms that mediate pain, central processing of pain perception, disease-related pain, and the transition from acute to chronic pain.

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), National Institutes of Health
The mission of NCCIH is to define, through rigorous scientific investigation, the usefulness and safety of complementary and integrative health interventions and their roles in improving health and health care. NCCIH is studying how nondrug approaches (e.g., acupuncture, spinal manipulation, mindfulness-based stress reduction, massage, and yoga) can be used to develop a new standard of care for pain management. About 40 percent of NCCIH’s budget is dedicated to researching the mechanisms, safety, and effectiveness of these mind and body approaches, as well as natural products for pain.

NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), National Institutes of Health
The mission of NIH OBSSR is to

  • Enhance the impact of health-related behavioral and social sciences research.
  • Coordinate behavioral and social sciences research conducted or supported by NIH and integrate these sciences within the larger NIH research enterprise.
  • Communicate health-related behavioral and social sciences research findings to various stakeholders within and outside of the federal government.
  • Social and behavioral factors play a critical role in pain experience, interference, and treatment. OBSSR is interested in how these social and behavioral factors contribute to a range of pain conditions, the accurate assessment of pain, and the effective treatment and management of pain.

National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health
NCI leads, conducts, and supports cancer research across the nation to advance scientific knowledge and help all people live longer, healthier lives. NCI is interested in research focused on both treatment-related pain conditions and disease-related painful conditions. In particular, NCI seeks projects focused on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, aromatase inhibitor arthralgias, radiation-induced pain conditions, metastatic bone pain, and primary tumors that are no longer responsive to cancer treatment, particularly in the pancreas, brain, and head and neck.

National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), National Institutes of Health
The mission of NINR is to promote and improve the health of individuals, families, and communities. NINR supports and conducts clinical and basic research and research training on health and illness, research that spans and integrates behavioral and biological sciences, and research that develops the scientific basis for clinical practice. From acute pain symptoms associated with a variety of causes such as injury, to pain as a symptom in a chronic condition, understanding and managing pain to improve quality of life is an important focus of NINR’s research in symptom science.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health
The mission of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism is to generate and disseminate fundamental knowledge about the effects of alcohol on health and well-being, and to apply that knowledge to improve diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of alcohol-related problems, including alcohol use disorder, across the lifespan.

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), National Institutes of Health
The mission of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research is to improve dental, oral, and craniofacial health. NIDCR supports a wide range of basic, translational, clinical, and behavioral research on pain, with a focus on temporomandibular joint disorders, trigeminal neuropathies, burning mouth syndrome, oral cancer pain, dental pain, and other conditions.

For more information about the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services or NIH, visit www.nih.gov.